Knife Sharpening the easy way

In my post reviewing the Mora Companion knife, I mentioned the Smith Abrasives 2-Step Knife Sharpener.

From the Manufacturer

Smith’s 2-Step Knife Sharpener features two tungsten carbide blades with pre-set angles to ensure the perfect edge every time. Three or four strokes through the carbide sharpening slots will restore the edge on a very dull knife. The two crossed ceramic rods also have pre-set angles and provide a smooth finished edge to already sharp knives. Excellent for use on all types of knives, especially filet knives.

 

Here is how I use it.

 

  1. Get a knife, dull is OK
    .
  2. To test the edge’s sharpness, I set the blade on a fingernail using the weight of the knife only, and pull it across your nail. If it drags (resists), its is sharp.* You may jump to steps 7,8, & 9 to touch up your edge.
  3. Get a Smith Abrasives 2-Step Knife Sharpener
  4. Find a stable platform to work on, kitchen table, counter top, etc
  5. On the Smith Abrasives 2-Step Knife Sharpener, locate the side marked “Coarse Carbide” and drag the entire length of the knife edge to be sharpened across the carbide “V”, Using smooth strokes, do this 10+ times
  6. Inspect the edge to see if there is now a uniform “new & shiny” surface to the blade at the very bottom, if not, repeat step 4 checking every couple strokes until you have cut a uniform edge across the entire length.
  7. Flip the Smith Abrasives 2-Step Knife Sharpener over, and now repeat step 4 at least 10 times on the side marked “Fine Ceramic”, more is ok, but don’t do less.
  8. To test the edge’s sharpness, I set the blade on a fingernail using the weight of the knife only, and pull it across your nail. If it drags (resists), its is sharp.* If it slides, repeat step 6.
  9. Options: Take a pair of old jeans, a leather belt (REAL leather!), or piece of heavy canvas and drag the knife away from the edge, alternating each side.

*- Ladies, this WILL leave a mark on your fancy nails, have your man test it, use a toenail, or a tomato (the weight of the knife alone should be enough to slice the `mater)

 

Is this the BEST way to sharpen a knife? No way! Is this even close? Probably not…but if you are reading this, and learning something, odds are this is the best you’ll ever want to manage yourself. If nothing else, this will be a great starting point in your search for the perfect knife sharpening method.

7 comments:

    1. I grabbed an Old Hickory that was neglected intentionally. Step number 1 stated “dull is ok”. And FWIW, I prefer the old, carbon steel knives over the stainless ones. I also prefer this type of Old Hickory for most knife work for steaks and such. Anything with a serrated edge is noting more than a cheap saw :)

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